The Poetic Edda: Volume II: Mythological Poems by Ursula Dronke

By Ursula Dronke

This new version of mythological poems from the Poetic Edda takes the reader deep into the mind's eye of the Viking poets (c.1000 AD). environment textual content and translation aspect by way of aspect, Dronke offers complete introductions and commentaries for every of the poems.

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This re-creation of mythological poems from the Poetic Edda takes the reader deep into the mind's eye of the Viking poets (c. one thousand AD). surroundings textual content and translation aspect by way of facet, Dronke offers complete introductions and commentaries for every of the poems.

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These two elegies are in outline the same kind of poem as Cat. LXXVII and xci, in which the poet addresses people who have betrayed his trust in an affair of love. But their content is concerned chiefly with Cynthia and Propertius: Cynthia's beauty and power to charm and to intimidate, and Propertius' total subjection. P. v, cxxxix, 5-6 (Meleager): f\ y&p poi uop

XX Hoc pro continuo te, Galle, monemus amore, (id tibi ne uacuo defluat ex animo) saepe imprudenti fortuna occurrit amanti: crudelis Minyis dixerit Ascanius. est tibi non infra speciem, non nomine dispar, Theiodamanteo proximus ardor Hylae: 17 te longae eodd. pleriqu*: longe te NA XX $ specie Heinsius 8 22 heu Hertsbirg: e O 5 10 15 20 as ELEGIARUM LIBER I huic tu, siue leges umbrosae flumina siluae, siue Aniena tuos tinxerit unda pedes, siue Gigantea spatiabere litoris ora, siue ubicumque uago fluminis hospitio, N y m p h a r u m semper cupidas defende rapinas (non minor Ausoniis est amor Adryasin); ne tibi sint duri montes et frigida saxa, Galle, neque expertos semper adire lacus: quae miser ignotis error perpessus in oris Herculis indomito fleuerat Ascanio.

Turn mihi non ullo mors sit amara loco. quam uereor, ne te contempto, Cynthia, busto abstrahat, heu, nostro puluere iniquus amor, cogat et inuitam lacrimas siccare cadentis! flectitur assiduis certa puella minis, quare, dum licet, inter nos laetemur amantes: non satis est ullo tempore longus amor. XX Hoc pro continuo te, Galle, monemus amore, (id tibi ne uacuo defluat ex animo) saepe imprudenti fortuna occurrit amanti: crudelis Minyis dixerit Ascanius. est tibi non infra speciem, non nomine dispar, Theiodamanteo proximus ardor Hylae: 17 te longae eodd.

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