Byzantine identity and its patrons: Embroidered aeres and by Henry Schilb

By Henry Schilb

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Extra info for Byzantine identity and its patrons: Embroidered aeres and epitaphioi of the Palaiologan and post-Byzantine periods

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Perhaps the most famous extant example of the type of curtain that would hang in a templon or doorway, like the two described in this inventory, is the Nun Jefimija’s curtain for the Royal Doors of the Chilandar Monastery Katholikon, Mount Athos of circa 1399 (figure 91). Inventories and typika such as “Rule of Michael Attaleiates” are helpful for understanding how liturgical textiles were described and which terms were used to describe them. The word “katapetasma,” however, refers in this single text specifically to a type of curtain for the templon and more generally to other types of curtains and hangings.

39 Johnstone, The Byzantine Tradition in Church Embroidery, 114. ”; Johnstone, The Byzantine Tradition in Church Embroidery, 114; Alfred J. Andrea, Contemporary Sources for the Fourth Crusade, vol. 29, The Medieval Mediterranean: Peoples, Economies and Cultures, 400–1453 (Leiden: Brill, 2000), 226–27, 39. 36 was meant to cover the diskos, and the other was meant to cover the chalice. This is perhaps an obvious point, but it is a point worth noting. 42 The iconography, also damaged, reinforces the distinction.

Since aëres and epitaphioi are characteristically Orthodox Christian textiles, I have not compared or contrasted them with analogous textiles of the Latin West. D. , University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2002). 21 Maria Theocharis, “Afierotikai epigrafai epi amfion tou Atho,” Theologia 28 (1957): 452–56; Maria Theocharis, “Anekdota amfia tes Mones Faneromenes Salaminos,” Theologia 27 (1956): 325–33; Maria Theocharis, “Chrysokenteta amphia,” in The Holy and Great Monastery of Vatopaidi: Tradition, History, Art (Mount Athos: The Monastery of Vatopaidi, 1998), 421–24; Maria Theocharis, “Church Gold Embroideries,” in Sinai: Treasures of the Monastery of Saint Catherine, ed.

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