Athenian political oratory: 16 key speeches by David Phillips

By David Phillips

This ebook is designed basically to supply scholars of Greek historical past with a set oftranslated speeches illustrating political advancements among the top of thePeloponnesian warfare (404 B.C.) and the demise of Alexander the nice (323 B.C.). Thespeeches during this assortment have been brought in Athens: a few within the meeting, others incourts of legislations. All yet one have been written by way of citizens of Athens; the only real exception, a letterpenned by means of Philip II of Macedon, used to be learn out to the Athenian meeting through anambassador. those speeches, for that reason, are assets of first value for Atheniandomestic and international politics.

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Extra resources for Athenian political oratory: 16 key speeches

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11] At any rate, he went to Sparta and stayed there for a long time, leaving you behind under siege, knowing that you the people were in dire straits and that many of you lacked necessities on account of the war and its disasters. He thought that if he kept you in the condition you were in, you would be gladly willing to make peace on any terms at all. [12] The men who remained here plotting to overthrow the democracy then put Cleophon on trial. The pretext was that he had not returned to camp to rest,9 but the truth was that he had spoken on your behalf against destroying the walls.

25] Did you arrest Polemarchus or not? Eratosthenes. I did what I was ordered to do by the authorities,14 because I was afraid. Were you in the Council Hall when the discussion about us occurred? Eratosthenes. I was. Did you support those who urged our killing or oppose them? Eratosthenes. I opposed them, so that you would not be killed. Believing that we were suffering unjustly or justly? Eratosthenes. Unjustly. [26] So then, you most miserable of all men, you opposed the plan in order to save us, but you took part in the arrests in order to kill us?

So come up here, please, and answer whatever I ask you. [25] Did you arrest Polemarchus or not? Eratosthenes. I did what I was ordered to do by the authorities,14 because I was afraid. Were you in the Council Hall when the discussion about us occurred? Eratosthenes. I was. Did you support those who urged our killing or oppose them? Eratosthenes. I opposed them, so that you would not be killed. Believing that we were suffering unjustly or justly? Eratosthenes. Unjustly. [26] So then, you most miserable of all men, you opposed the plan in order to save us, but you took part in the arrests in order to kill us?

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