A Narratological Commentary on the Odyssey by Irene J. F. de Jong

By Irene J. F. de Jong

Complete commentaries at the Homeric texts abound, yet this remark concentrates on one significant point of the Odyssey--its narrative paintings. The function of narrator and narratees, tools of characterization and surroundings description, and the improvement of the plot are mentioned. The research goals to reinforce our knowing of this masterpiece of eu literature. All Greek references are translated and technical phrases are defined in a thesaurus. it really is directed at scholars and students of Greek literature and comparative literature.

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177), the pronoun used to refer to an absent person. As such it is the most appropriate pronoun for those at home to refer to Odysseus; indeed, fifty-nine out of a total of eightynine instances of (singular) ke›now/§ke›now in the Odyssey concern him. 122–30, 372–8), announcements of his return voiced by ‘the beggar’/Odysseus (see especially Eumaeus in Book 14 and Penelope in Book 19), and even the hero’s self-identification (cf. ). 215–24). 169–77 The identification of the guest53 is a vital part of a Homeric visit, in that it guarantees the host reciprocal hospitality in the future.

These men [Suitors] are consuming the livestock of Odysseus (159–60), who is dead (161–8). (transitional formula) But tell me this (169): who are you? On which ship did you come? Are you perhaps a guestfriend of my father (170–7)? (opening formula) All right, I will tell you (179). I am Mentes. I came on my own ship. I am an old guest-friend of your father (180–95). Griffin (1980: 191–2). Klingner (1964: 54–68), Besslich (1966: 125–8), and Rüter (1969: 132–201). 24 book one B’ D Telemachus D’ E Athena E’ D’’ F Telemachus G F’ Athena Telemachus Athena G’ F’’ F’’’ H H’ (‘catch-word’ technique †: je›noi .

These men [Suitors] are consuming the livestock of Odysseus (159–60), who is dead (161–8). (transitional formula) But tell me this (169): who are you? On which ship did you come? Are you perhaps a guestfriend of my father (170–7)? (opening formula) All right, I will tell you (179). I am Mentes. I came on my own ship. I am an old guest-friend of your father (180–95). Griffin (1980: 191–2). Klingner (1964: 54–68), Besslich (1966: 125–8), and Rüter (1969: 132–201). 24 book one B’ D Telemachus D’ E Athena E’ D’’ F Telemachus G F’ Athena Telemachus Athena G’ F’’ F’’’ H H’ (‘catch-word’ technique †: je›noi .

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